Forensic committee – TWGFEX http://twgfex.org/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 17:04:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://twgfex.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/twg-120x120.png Forensic committee – TWGFEX http://twgfex.org/ 32 32 Technical Committee reports to Supreme Court https://twgfex.org/technical-committee-reports-to-supreme-court/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 12:34:05 +0000 https://twgfex.org/technical-committee-reports-to-supreme-court/ The three-member panel formed to investigate the use of Pegasus spyware against journalists, activists, politicians and other Indian citizens has submitted its report to the Supreme Court, Hindustan reported today. Times. The submission was made almost a week ago, according to the report. The contents of the report remain confidential, the HT report says. At […]]]>

The three-member panel formed to investigate the use of Pegasus spyware against journalists, activists, politicians and other Indian citizens has submitted its report to the Supreme Court, Hindustan reported today. Times. The submission was made almost a week ago, according to the report.

The contents of the report remain confidential, the HT report says. At the last hearing, in May 2022, Judge RV Raveendran, who oversees the technical committee, had requested time until June 20 to submit the committee’s final report which, the latest report notes, has now arrived after multiple delays. ‘.

In May, a bench of three judges including Chief Justice of India NV Ramana and Justices Surya Kant and Hima Kohli had asked for the case to be listed next at the end of July: however, no date has yet been set. HT’s report says the case could go to a bench of the aforementioned judges on August 12.

Why is this important? Last year, several petitions were filed in the Supreme Court challenging the use of the Pegasus spyware and calling for a supervised judicial inquiry into, among other things, its deployment. Pegasus, a product of Israel-based NSO Group, is said to be a highly sophisticated spyware that can remotely access a device’s microphone, camera, text messages, WhatsApp chats, and more. In July 2021, investigations by a consortium of 17 news agencies around the world revealed that 300 Indians had been listed as persons of interest for surveillance through the spyware, which included individuals like the leader of Congress Rahul Gandhi, former Chief Ministers of Karnataka HD Kumaraswamy, Siddaramaiah, among other lawyers, bureaucrats, private sector professionals, journalists, election commission officials, etc.

What is the technical committee empowered to look into?

The SC had authorized the committee to examine the following points:

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I. “Whether the Pegasus spyware suite was used on the phones or other devices of Indian citizens to access stored data, eavesdrop on conversations, intercept information and/or for any other purpose not explicitly stated here?
ii. Details of victims and/or people affected by such spyware attack.
iii. What steps/actions were taken by the Respondent Union of India following reports in 2019 of Indian citizens’ WhatsApp accounts being hacked, using the Pegasus spyware suite.
iv. If a Pegasus spyware suite was acquired by the Respondent Union of India, or by a state government, or by any central or state agency for use against Indian citizens?
v. If a government agency used the Pegasus spyware suite on citizens of that country, under what law, rule, guideline, protocol, or legal process was such deployment made?
vi. If a national entity/person has used the spyware on citizens of that country, is such use permitted?
vii. Any other matter or aspect which may be related, ancillary or incidental to the above terms of reference, which the Committee may deem appropriate and appropriate to
investigate.”

Apart from these issues, the SC had also empowered the committee to make recommendations on improving existing surveillance mechanisms, ways to address suspicions of illegal surveillance, improve cybersecurity in the country, and more.

What the Technical Committee has reviewed so far

At the May 19 hearing, the committee reportedly informed the court that it had so far

  • Carrying out forensic analyzes of 29 telephones
  • Has been “in the process of contacting persons/entities who may shed light on the subject of the investigation”
  • Developed its own software to detect malware
  • Requested responses from aggrieved persons, investigative agencies and state governments

Previously, he had also recorded testimonies from expert witnesses, victims, parliamentarians and others involved in the case.

Read also :

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Expenditure and Funding Oversight Committee Update | News, Sports, Jobs https://twgfex.org/expenditure-and-funding-oversight-committee-update-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 06:00:09 +0000 https://twgfex.org/expenditure-and-funding-oversight-committee-update-news-sports-jobs/ CHARLESTON — The Legislative Health and Human Resources Accountability Oversight Committee (LOCHHRA) met for nearly three hours on Tuesday to hear testimony from the Office of the Inspector General and representatives of the Department of Health and West Virginia Human Resources. Only state senators were present at Tuesday’s meeting, with members of the […]]]>

CHARLESTON — The Legislative Health and Human Resources Accountability Oversight Committee (LOCHHRA) met for nearly three hours on Tuesday to hear testimony from the Office of the Inspector General and representatives of the Department of Health and West Virginia Human Resources.

Only state senators were present at Tuesday’s meeting, with members of the House of Delegates being called into special session. Christina Mullins, Commissioner of the Bureau for Behavioral Health (BBH) was the first to present.

“From 2017 to 2020, BBH received nearly $201 million,” Mullins started. “We spent over $166 million and returned $34 million – that’s in federal funds.”

Mullins then explained how the majority of these federal funds are “linked to two main grant programs – the State Targeted Response Program and the State Opioid Response Program.”

Although not all of the federal funds have yet been spent, Mullins said, the money has been “critical in the state’s response to substance abuse disorders.”

“We are constantly working to balance the need to deploy financial resources quickly, while ensuring that funds are managed appropriately,” Mullins added.

Mullins also noted that delays in the disbursement of funds were largely unavoidable.

“While BBH saw a greater than 1,200% increase in discretionary funds, West Virginia lacked the infrastructure to quickly expand that level of funding,” Mullins, before adding that significant progress has nevertheless been made.

“The $34 million that was returned to the federal government, why was it returned?” Senator Amy Grady, R-Mason, asked at the end of Mullins’ presentation.

Mullins explained that the funds were returned primarily due to infrastructural and administrative issues encountered while trying to allocate them within acceptable use.

Next to present to the committee was Tisa Wiseman from the Office of the Inspector General (OIG).

“One of the big questions you had (at the June committee meeting) was about OIG salaries – you wanted to know if DHHR had any input into that process,” Wiseman said. “The answer is that a lot of people have a say. The inspector general, the program manager, whoever hires that person—they make a salary recommendation.

According to Wiseman, the Inspector General has “the last word” on OIG salaries. However, all BIG salaries require final Governor approval.

Sen. Jack David Woodrum, R-Summers, asked which department was responsible for setting the OIG budget, and was informed by Wiseman that the OIG was responsible for setting the budget for itself. As with salaries, the OIG budget requires final approval from the Governor.

The third to speak was Dr Ayne Amjad, Commissioner of the Bureau of Public Health (BPH), who provided the committee with an overview of the Bureau’s hierarchy, including specific responsibilities and current vacancies in departments.

“Is there a strategy to improve the health of our population? Woodrum asked clearly at the end of Amjad’s presentation. “We rank very low with the health of our citizens.”

“We know that West Virginia ranks first in obesity, hypertension, and diabetes,” Amjad replied “Some of the grants – they’re used to try to target the highest risk morbidities, and those are the ones we’re trying to focus on in terms of strategies.”

“Do you see success? » Woodrum continued. “Do you have any data indicating that these programs work the way you want them to?”

“I think it’s hard to measure success with this, especially when we’re still in the worst three states,” Amjad said. “As of now, I don’t see anything to indicate it’s working or not working.”

Next before the committee were Shevonna Lusk, Chief Operating Officer of the Office of Health Facilities (OHF) and Dr. Colleen Lillard, Clinical Director of Statewide Forensics, who provided similar insight. of the operational competence of the OHF.

“From 2014 to 2022, we had an increase – essentially 66% – in the number of forensic patients”, Lusk advised the committee. “Forensic placement, (over the same period) we have had an increase in community placement. That’s exactly what we want to see: a 31% increase.”

“I will give a brief overview of some of our successes and some of our weaknesses,” Lillard said, before reminding the committee that SB 702 – enacted in 2021 – “modernized West Virginia’s medico-legal laws.”

“I think the biggest success for us has been the creation and implementation of the Dangerousness Assessment Advisory Board,” notes Lillard. “We have had one court referral to date.”

Lillard cited staffing issues as the department’s main weakness right now.

Tuesday’s final presenter was Mark Drennan, executive director of the W.Va. Behavioral Healthcare Providers Association (WVBHPA), to testify on medical licensing.

“What we are talking about is the involuntary commitment process,” began Drennan. “Our (WVBHPA) members are the guardians of the mental hygiene process.”

“There is a simple flow to the process”, Drennan explained. “A relative or someone who knows the person submits a request declaring that “this person is a danger to themselves or to others”. If the clerk accepts the request, a pick-up order is initiated.

At this point in the process, the county sheriff’s department is responsible for picking up the individual and transporting them to the designated facility for a mental hygiene evaluation.

“That’s where our people come in,” Drennen added. “If the individual is determined to be a danger, they move on to a mental hygiene hearing. If the court determines they are a danger, they are transported to a hospital where they receive treatment.

“Regarding the mental hygiene examination, what are the qualifications of an examiner?” Sen. Ron Stollings, D-Boone, asked Drennan.

Drennan said the exams are performed by licensed practitioners with advanced medical and psychological training, before adding that “I think drug addiction is linked to about 80% of the problems we have right now.”

LOCHHRA will meet again during the next interim legislative session, scheduled for September 11.



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Gujarat Government Forms Committee to Investigate Hooch Tragedy Case https://twgfex.org/gujarat-government-forms-committee-to-investigate-hooch-tragedy-case/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 10:50:56 +0000 https://twgfex.org/gujarat-government-forms-committee-to-investigate-hooch-tragedy-case/ Gandhinagar: In a damage control exercise, the government of Gujarat on Tuesday formed an investigative committee headed by the Inspector General of Police (IGP) to investigate the reasons behind the hooch tragedy case. As of Tuesday afternoon, 28 people have died after consuming illicit alcohol in rural districts of Ahmedabad and Botad. Of the 28 […]]]>

Gandhinagar: In a damage control exercise, the government of Gujarat on Tuesday formed an investigative committee headed by the Inspector General of Police (IGP) to investigate the reasons behind the hooch tragedy case. As of Tuesday afternoon, 28 people have died after consuming illicit alcohol in rural districts of Ahmedabad and Botad. Of the 28 deaths, two are suspicious.

Announcing the formation of the investigation committee, State Interior Minister Harsh Sanghvi said, “Subhash Trivedi-IGP (CID-crime) will lead the committee, while the other members are IAS Nikhil Gandhi and HP Sanghvi, director of the Gujarat Forensic Science Laboratory. . The committee will submit its report to the government within three days.

Later, speaking to reporters in Gandhinagar, Ashish Bhatia, Director General of Police (DGP), said: “The kingpin of the hooch tragedy is a certain Jayesh Khavadia, who is working with AMOS company as as supervisor. The company sells industrial alcohol (methyl alcohol) as it repackages industrial alcohol from 100 liter barrel to 2.5 liter bottles and supplies them to a factory in Changodar.

The officer further said, “During this transport, Jayesh stole 600 liters and sold them to his distant cousins ​​Vinod and Sanjay Bhikhabhai, against payment of Rs 40,000. The police recovered 460 unused liters with the brothers.

A Vipul smuggler who brought Vinod’s liquor also died after drinking illicit alcohol, the officer said.

After drinking illicit alcohol, 22 people died in Botad district, six in rural areas of Ahmedabad, while two deaths are suspicious. In these connections, three FIRs were filed, one each with Barwala, Ranpura and Dhandhuka.

“Rojid Village Panchayat had earlier complained to the local police about the hooch activity, and the police carried out raids six times. In this regard, FIRs have been filed and two bootleggers have been arrested,” said the DGP.

(IANS)

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Gujarat government forms committee to investigate hooch tragedy case https://twgfex.org/gujarat-government-forms-committee-to-investigate-hooch-tragedy-case-2/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 10:10:03 +0000 https://twgfex.org/gujarat-government-forms-committee-to-investigate-hooch-tragedy-case-2/ In a damage control exercise, the government of Gujarat on Tuesday formed an investigative committee headed by the Inspector General of Police (IGP) to investigate the reasons behind the hooch tragedy case. As of Tuesday afternoon, 28 people have died after consuming illicit alcohol in rural districts of Ahmedabad and Botad. Of the 28 deaths, […]]]>

In a damage control exercise, the government of Gujarat on Tuesday formed an investigative committee headed by the Inspector General of Police (IGP) to investigate the reasons behind the hooch tragedy case. As of Tuesday afternoon, 28 people have died after consuming illicit alcohol in rural districts of Ahmedabad and Botad. Of the 28 deaths, two are suspicious.

Announcing the formation of the investigation committee, State Interior Minister Harsh Sanghvi said, “Subhash Trivedi-IGP (CID-crime) will lead the committee, while the other members are IAS Nikhil Gandhi and HP Sanghvi, director of the Gujarat Forensic Science Laboratory. . The committee will submit its report to the government within three days.

Later, speaking to reporters in Gandhinagar, Ashish Bhatia, Director General of Police (DGP), said: “The kingpin of the hooch tragedy is a certain Jayesh Khavadia, who is working with AMOS company as as supervisor. The company sells industrial alcohol (methyl alcohol) as it repackages industrial alcohol from 100 liter barrel to 2.5 liter bottles and supplies them to a factory in Changodar.

The officer further said, “During this transport, Jayesh stole 600 liters and sold them to his distant cousins ​​Vinod and Sanjay Bhikhabhai, against payment of Rs 40,000. The police recovered 460 unused liters with the brothers.

A Vipul smuggler who brought Vinod’s liquor also died after drinking illicit alcohol, the officer said.

After drinking illicit alcohol, 22 people died in Botad district, six in rural areas of Ahmedabad, while two deaths are suspicious. In these connections, three FIRs were filed, one each with Barwala, Ranpura and Dhandhuka.

“Rojid Village Panchayat had earlier complained to the local police about the hooch activity, and the police carried out raids six times. In this regard, FIRs have been filed and two bootleggers have been arrested,” said the DGP.

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Postponement of the meeting of the parliamentary inquiry committee: the forensic report provided by the police will be studied – myRepublica https://twgfex.org/postponement-of-the-meeting-of-the-parliamentary-inquiry-committee-the-forensic-report-provided-by-the-police-will-be-studied-myrepublica/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 06:49:55 +0000 https://twgfex.org/postponement-of-the-meeting-of-the-parliamentary-inquiry-committee-the-forensic-report-provided-by-the-police-will-be-studied-myrepublica/ KATHMANDU, July 26: The meeting of the parliamentary commission of inquiry, formed to investigate former finance minister Janardhan Sharma, in Singh Durbar this morning has been postponed. The committee meeting will be held again at 4 p.m. in the afternoon. At the meeting, committee members are now reviewing the forensic report submitted by the police. […]]]>

KATHMANDU, July 26: The meeting of the parliamentary commission of inquiry, formed to investigate former finance minister Janardhan Sharma, in Singh Durbar this morning has been postponed. The committee meeting will be held again at 4 p.m. in the afternoon.

At the meeting, committee members are now reviewing the forensic report submitted by the police. In the forensic report handed over by the police, there is also a video of the Ministry of Finance (MoF) CCTV footage.

Previously, the Department of Finance said CCTV footage was only kept for 13 days, then it was automatically deleted and footage from that day was deleted. After that, the parliamentary committee requested the help of the police to recover the images.

Former finance minister Janardan Sharma has been accused of manipulating tax rates by calling unauthorized people to the ministry on the night of May 28, before presenting the budget for the financial year 2022/23 in the House representatives. Sharma resigned as finance minister after the allegations.

As the parliamentary commission of inquiry begins to investigate Sharma, the ministry’s CCTV footage has become of interest to all.

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The January 6 committee is not over. Expect more hearings, reveals and reports https://twgfex.org/the-january-6-committee-is-not-over-expect-more-hearings-reveals-and-reports/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 12:59:00 +0000 https://twgfex.org/the-january-6-committee-is-not-over-expect-more-hearings-reveals-and-reports/ The curtain fell Thursday night on the January 6 Committee’s Summer Hearings, a series which, through highly produced presentations and explosive testimony, gave audiences an inside view of what led to the attack. of the Capitol. The Democratic-led panel presented its investigation into eight hearings in June and July, laying out its case that former […]]]>

The curtain fell Thursday night on the January 6 Committee’s Summer Hearings, a series which, through highly produced presentations and explosive testimony, gave audiences an inside view of what led to the attack. of the Capitol.

The Democratic-led panel presented its investigation into eight hearings in June and July, laying out its case that former President Donald Trump was at the center of a voter fraud plot that ultimately led to the insurgency on Capitol Hill – one he knew could turn violent but did nothing to stop.

And now?

Was Thursday’s hearing really the last?

No. The House Select committee on January 6 made it clear that it would resume hearings in September.

Republican Vice President Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., opened the latest summer hearing by noting the progress the committee has made, but she added that there is now new evidence and more witnesses to consider.

“The doors opened, new subpoenas were issued and the dam started to break,” Cheney said.

Already, in preparation for Thursday’s presentation, aides to the select committee had hinted that future hearings might take place.

Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

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Getty Images

Representative Liz Cheney, vice chair of the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers closing remarks during a July 21 prime-time hearing.

And committee chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., recently told reporters that the committee could release an initial report in September, followed by a final report later this year. The conclusions would be accompanied by hearings, he said.

“We just get a significant amount of information,” Thompson said. And the new evidence “pushes the timeline back.”

What’s next for the panel?

Cheney also noted during this week’s hearing that the panel will now return to its investigative mode for the next few weeks.

“Our committee will spend August researching emerging information on multiple fronts, before convening new hearings in September,” Cheney said.

Committee members had been reluctant to call this next step the committee’s last. On the contrary, some, like California Democratic Rep. Pete Aguilar, simply call it the “next chapter.”

“There are issues we want to get to the bottom of and significant progress we’ve made during the hearings to date,” Aguilar told NPR. “I’m looking forward to continuing and doing more work, but ultimately we’re committed to finding the facts, to finding the truth and that’s what we’re looking to do.”

With the intention of releasing its findings in the form of reports and additional hearings, the committee is racing to process new evidence along the way.

For example, the panel is currently examining allegations that the Secret Service deleted text messages during a two-day period surrounding the January 6 attack. Department of Homeland Security Inspector General Joseph Cuffari claimed the messages were deleted after a request from his office, while the Secret Service denied the allegations, saying the deletions were part of a migration from the system.

A subpoena only returned one text message, a select committee aide and members said. The Secret Service says it produced thousands of documents in response to the subpoena, issued last week, and is conducting a forensic analysis to try to recover the texts.

“I think the important thing to note is that they didn’t turn over the texts that we were looking for,” committee member Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., told NPR.

This, as the panel seeks to further corroborate the sworn testimony of former Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson, the former senior aide to Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows, who shared a fresh wave explosive testimonies at an emergency hearing. last month.

There are also looming questions about whether the panel will decide whether to formally recommend a criminal referral of Trump to the Justice Department, and whether he or former Vice President Mike Pence should be formally invited to testify.

With Republicans expected to take control of the House in the fall, the committee faces a deadline before a new Congress sits next year.

Members are aware their ongoing investigation may continue until the midterm elections in November, but echoing Aguilar’s remarks, they pledge to unearth all possible findings by the end of the year.

Will the panel’s report lead to concrete actions?

The report should lay the groundwork, following as closely as possible the 9/11 commission report, of the causes that fueled the January 6 attack and the means to ensure that another siege does not happen again. never.

It will encompass much of what the panel shared during its hearings, uncovered through witness interviews and evidence obtained through requests for documents and records.

The committee could include recommendations for legislative fixes to try to thwart new efforts to circumvent US election laws. This includes potential proposals to reform the Electoral Count Act of 1887.

Many said the law was outdated and badly in need of reform. Several proposals have already made the rounds of Congress, pushing to raise the threshold for objection to the results of a state’s presidential election and revamp the role of the vice president as chairman of the mostly ceremonial matter.

Members of the January 6 panel argued that the law was weak enough to allow Trump to attempt to manipulate the 2020 election by trying to force Pence to overturn last year’s results.

And last week, a bipartisan Senate group swept through the proposals, reaching agreement on a plan to address the murky law and other election safeguards. The legislation could potentially attract the 60 votes needed to pass the Senate.

The senses. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Joe Manchin, DW.Va., led the 16-member effort, including nine Republican co-sponsors, in an evenly divided Senate.

“From the beginning, our bipartisan group shared a vision for drafting legislation to correct the flaws of the archaic and ambiguous Voter Count Act of 1887,” the U.S. senators said in a joint statement.

The Senate’s pull could bode well for future negotiations with the House to finally push the legislation onto President Biden’s desk.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Parliamentary committee questions Janardan Sharma https://twgfex.org/parliamentary-committee-questions-janardan-sharma/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 06:01:08 +0000 https://twgfex.org/parliamentary-committee-questions-janardan-sharma/ Janardan Sharma has dismissed allegations that, as finance minister, he allowed two unauthorized individuals to alter tax rates in the current year budget a day before it was presented to parliament. Responding to the parliamentary commission of inquiry formed to investigate the allegations, he said only authorized people prepared the budget for the financial year […]]]>

Janardan Sharma has dismissed allegations that, as finance minister, he allowed two unauthorized individuals to alter tax rates in the current year budget a day before it was presented to parliament.

Responding to the parliamentary commission of inquiry formed to investigate the allegations, he said only authorized people prepared the budget for the financial year 2022-23 which he presented to parliament on May 29.

“He said the allegations against him were fabricated,” said a member of the investigating committee. “He said the Ministry of Finance was preparing the budget following due process only with the participation of authorized officials. He also argued that the entry of unauthorized persons is not possible.

The inquiry committee was formed after widespread criticism following media reports that Sharma had invited two foreigners to change tax rates on the night of May 28.

Following the formation of the 11-member investigation committee on July 6, Sharma resigned the same day to “facilitate” the investigation process.

So far, the parliamentary committee has also interviewed senior ministry officials and journalists have uncovered Sharma’s story.

Ministry officials, including Finance Secretary Madhu Kumar Marasini and Revenue Secretary Krishna Hari Pushkar, as well as Head of Budget Division Chakra Bahadur Budha, Head of Administrative Division Kedar Nath Sharma have also dismissed claims that there were strangers in the department to change tax rates. .

After failing to obtain CCTV footage from the night of May 28, the Investigative Committee turned over the hard drive to the Central Police Forensic Science Lab on Wednesday to determine if the footage had been deleted and if it could be recovered.

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Secret Service gives thousands of documents to Jan. 6 committee, but has yet to retrieve potentially missing texts https://twgfex.org/secret-service-gives-thousands-of-documents-to-jan-6-committee-but-has-yet-to-retrieve-potentially-missing-texts/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 18:56:15 +0000 https://twgfex.org/secret-service-gives-thousands-of-documents-to-jan-6-committee-but-has-yet-to-retrieve-potentially-missing-texts/ By Ryan Nobles, Zachary Cohen, Annie Grayer and Whitney Wild, CNN The US Secret Service on Tuesday produced an “initial package of documents” to the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection, in response to a subpoena last week that was issued in the middle of reports of potentially missing text messages since […]]]>

By Ryan Nobles, Zachary Cohen, Annie Grayer and Whitney Wild, CNN

The US Secret Service on Tuesday produced an “initial package of documents” to the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection, in response to a subpoena last week that was issued in the middle of reports of potentially missing text messages since the day of the uprising. insurrection.

“Our delivery included thousands of pages of documents, Secret Service cell phone use and other policies, and operational and planning records,” USSS spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. , in a press release.

However, Tuesday’s production of documents did not include any potentially missing texts from January 5 and 6, 2021, a Secret Service official told CNN. Indeed, the agency has still not been able to recover recordings lost during a telephone migration at that time, the official said.

“Any message that was not uploaded by the employee as a government record would have been lost during the migration,” the USSS official told CNN, referring to the agency’s backup procedures.

Prior to the phone migration, Secret Service employees were expected to manually back up their text messages. If employees had skipped this step, their texts would have been permanently deleted when their phones were wiped during the migration.

The Secret Service insists it is still trying to recover lost messages.

“We continue to review our records, databases and archives to ensure full compliance with the Committee’s subpoena,” Guglielmi said in a statement. “We are taking all possible steps to identify cases responding to the subpoena, including forensic examinations of agency phones and other investigative techniques.”

The Secret Service informed the committee on Tuesday that it was “not currently aware” of any text messages that were not withheld, according to a source familiar with the Secret Service’s communication with the committee.

“We are currently not aware of any text messages issued by Secret Service employees between December 7, 2020 and January 8, 2021 requested by the OIG that were not retained as part of the Intune migration,” said writes the agency to the committee.

Congress notified the Secret Service that it needed to preserve and produce Jan. 6-related documents on Jan. 16, 2021, and again on Jan. 25, 2021, for four different committees investigating what happened, depending on the source. The Secret Service migration did not begin until January 27, 2021.

“No one along the way has stopped and thought, well, maybe we shouldn’t do the data and device migration until we’re able to meet these four demands of Congress. “said Democratic Representative Stephanie Murphy of Florida, a member of the committee. , in an interview on MSNBC. “The process, as explained to us, was simply to leave it up to the agent to determine whether or not there was something on their phone worth recording and needed to be registered in the federal archives.”

Separately, a source familiar with the matter told CNN that employees were twice ordered to back up their phones.

Secret Service employees were told in December 2020 and again in January 2020 that if they needed to back up their phones, they would have to do it manually, a source familiar told CNN. The source said employees were given instructions on how to perform the manual backup.

Earlier Tuesday, the National Archives joined a growing list of federal agencies and officials demanding answers on the batch of missing text messages.

Laurence Brewer, the US government’s records chief, sent a letter to the records officer at the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday asking the agency to clarify whether the text messages were deleted and explain why.

“If it is determined that any text messages were improperly deleted (regardless of their relevance to the OIG/Congressional investigation of the events of January 6, 2021), then the Secret Service should send a report to NARA within 30 calendar days of the date of this letter with a report documenting the deletion,” Brewer wrote in the letter to Damian Kokinda, the DHS Records Officer, referring to the DHS Office of Inspector General .

The possible deletion of texts was first brought to light last week by the Inspector General of Homeland Security, who sent a letter to the chairs of the House and Senate Homeland Security Committees informing them that the texts could be missing and raising concerns that DHS officials were slow. to respond to their requests for information.

The letter led the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection to summon Inspector General Joseph Cuffari to a closed-door meeting two days after his letter was published. The committee also quickly issued a subpoena Friday to the Secret Service, demanding the records, their first such request to an executive branch agency.

The National Archives’ request is separate from the House’s Jan. 6 inquiry. Their job is to protect and preserve government records, and by law they can compel an agency to explain why records may have gone missing. The investigation into what went wrong will not be carried out by the Archives themselves, but rather by the Secret Service, which must then submit a report to the Archives.

“The USSS has 30 days to submit a report to NARA on its investigation into the circumstances of this alleged unauthorized deletion,” a spokesperson for the National Archives said in a statement to CNN. “In general, investigations into instances of unauthorized disposal, deletion, or removal are conducted by designated agency records officers who direct records management programs at agencies.”

The Department of Homeland Security has previously said it will comply with the committee’s Jan. 6 subpoena request, saying in a statement that the department “has and will continue to assure that the DHS office of the Inspector General (OIG) and the Select Committee investigating the January 6 attack on the United States Capitol has the information it has requested.

The members of the select committee believe that it is possible that the text messages can still be recovered. They planned to receive some of the material as early as Tuesday.

“We received a briefing from the Inspector General of Homeland Security,” Rep. Zoe Logren, a committee member and Democrat from California, told ABC News on Sunday. “And then there was a statement made by the spokesperson for the ministry saying that it was not true, it was not fair, and that in fact they had relevant texts. And here we go, okay, if you have them, we need them. And we hope to have them by this Tuesday. So we’ll see.

This story and headline were updated with additional developments on Tuesday.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Jamie Gangel and Marshall Cohen contributed to this report.

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As the SC committee prepares to submit its report soon, here’s what we know about the work being done https://twgfex.org/as-the-sc-committee-prepares-to-submit-its-report-soon-heres-what-we-know-about-the-work-being-done/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 07:05:17 +0000 https://twgfex.org/as-the-sc-committee-prepares-to-submit-its-report-soon-heres-what-we-know-about-the-work-being-done/ New Delhi: Eight months after an expert panel was set up to determine whether Indian law enforcement bought and used Israeli military-grade spyware Pegasus, the panel has yet to submit its findings to the court supreme. The investigation is expected to shed more light on the findings of Project Pegasus – a 2021 global media […]]]>

New Delhi: Eight months after an expert panel was set up to determine whether Indian law enforcement bought and used Israeli military-grade spyware Pegasus, the panel has yet to submit its findings to the court supreme.

The investigation is expected to shed more light on the findings of Project Pegasus – a 2021 global media investigation that found traces of Pegasus on the phones of human rights activists, lawyers, journalists and politicians in more from 10 countries across the globe including India.

The spyware is made by Israel’s NSO Group and, according to the company, is only licensed to “approved governments.”

At a hearing in May 2022, the Supreme Court reviewed an interim report that had been submitted and granted the Inquiry Committee, which is headed by former Supreme Court Justice Justice RV Raveendran, time until June 20 to complete its work.

Thread learned that the panel will submit a final report shortly, probably before the end of this month. Chief Justice of India (CJI) NV Ramana, who led the bench that ordered the inquest, is due to retire on August 26, 2022.

What was the mandate of the committee?

The mandate of the inquiry committee was set by the Supreme Court in October 2021. In a nutshell, the committee had three main tasks. The first was whether Pegasus was used on the phones of Indian citizens and if so, the details of the victims.

The second was to confirm whether Pegasus had been acquired by a central or state agency and used against Indian citizens Finally, if it turned out that Pegasus had indeed been used by an Indian agency, to examine whether such use was legal and authorized.

What we know the committee has done so far

Over the past eight months, the work of the Pegasus probe panel has been funneled down three different paths. They are:

1. Digital forensics: The technical committee, whose work is overseen by Judge Raveendran, collected 29 smartphones for analysis. These devices mostly belong to people identified by Project Pegasus as having been potential targets. The committee presumably examined the phones forensically for evidence of Pegasus targeting or infection.

2. Collection of declarations: The panel interviewed a number of expert witnesses, parliamentarians and Pegasus targets. According to the committee’s website, 13 people testified, including technical experts Anand V. and Sandeep Shukla. Others who testified include The wire is Siddharth Varadarajan and Professor David Kaye, who until 2020 was the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression.

3. Interfacing with state governments: Media reported that the panel has begun contacting various state governments. For example, in April 2022, the committee contacted all of the state’s “Directors General of Police” (DGPs) to ask if they had purchased the spyware from the NSO Group.

“Has any state, state police, state intelligence, or agency within state or union government territory with access to Pegasus spyware used it on a citizen Indian ? If so, whether one or more authorizations or sanctions for such use have been obtained and if so from whom,” the Secretary General of the Supreme Court asked all the DGPs citing the questions of the technical committee.

What we don’t know about committee work

While the Pegasus panel’s website transparently documents progress in some areas, the public is less informed about others, particularly regarding the committee’s interactions with the Narendra Modi government.

For example, it is unclear whether bureaucrats working with the Interior Ministry, intelligence agencies and the office of the National Security Adviser were called in for deposition or asked to provide statements. If so, the committee’s website does not reflect this, even though the testimony of all civil society actors has been clearly documented.

It is also unclear whether organizations such as the NSO Group or Citizen Lab (which published the first analysis of Pegasus’ activity in India in 2018) were questioned or cooperated in providing evidence. This point is particularly important because we don’t know the exact methodology the Technical Committee uses to forensically analyze the phones they have collected. The committee’s website says it’s open to using Amnesty International’s MVT toolkit, but still doesn’t provide a full picture of how they will decide if a device has been targeted or infected by Pegasus. .

Finally, during the Supreme Court hearings in 2021, Solicitor General Tushar Mehta indicated that national security concerns prevented the Modi government from publicly disclosing whether or not it purchased Pegasus. The best lawyer added that the government would however disclose all the details before the committee.

In January 2022, the New York Times reported that India’s purchase of Pegasus was part of a larger 2017 deal and likely cost the Center “millions” of dollars.

It’s unclear what the panel plans to do if the Center blocks its motions, particularly because it’s unclear whether the committee has specific powers to subpoena documents or records.

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Investigative panel into US Capitol attack subpoenas Secret Service over text messages – The Irish Times https://twgfex.org/investigative-panel-into-us-capitol-attack-subpoenas-secret-service-over-text-messages-the-irish-times/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 05:35:23 +0000 https://twgfex.org/investigative-panel-into-us-capitol-attack-subpoenas-secret-service-over-text-messages-the-irish-times/ The House Select Committee investigating the Capitol attack issued a subpoena to the US Secret Service for the January 5 and 6 text messages that were allegedly deleted. The subpoena issued on Friday evening – the first to an executive branch agency – compelled the production of messages and after-action reports about the attack as […]]]>

The House Select Committee investigating the Capitol attack issued a subpoena to the US Secret Service for the January 5 and 6 text messages that were allegedly deleted.

The subpoena issued on Friday evening – the first to an executive branch agency – compelled the production of messages and after-action reports about the attack as part of a broad request for documents aimed at establishing the circumstances surrounding erasing some communications and getting whatever remains.

Congressman Bennie Thompson, chairman of the select committee, said in a letter to Secret Service Director James Murray that the agency tasked with protecting the president and vice president should be able to produce the messages given by his spokesperson. none of the texts in question have been lost.

The revelation that texts among Secret Service agents from the day before and the day of the Capitol attack were erased in a “device replacement program” came in a letter to Congress from the Department’s inspector general. Homeland Security, the Secret Service watchdog.

On Friday morning, the source said, Inspector General Joseph Cuffari also complained to the select committee that the Secret Service chose to have him do an internal review of the agency’s January 6 response instead of after action reports – only to obstruct this internal review.

The Select Committee, during this briefing with the Inspector General, also heard that the Secret Service story of how the texts were lost kept changing. Initially, the source said, Mr Cuffari was told they had been lost during software upgrades; later, he was told it was during a process of replacing cellphones for agency staff.

The subpoena for the texts and any after-action reports — which the panel suspects probably don’t exist, according to the source — are aimed at obtaining all the texts that might not have been lost and get paper trails on how the texts that were lost came to be erased.

The January 6 investigators, working with Mr Cuffari, are also looking into whether the missing texts can be pieced together using forensic tools available to federal law enforcement, the Guardian first reported. .

The texts are important to Jan. 6 investigators because the Secret Service played a crucial role in preventing Donald Trump from visiting Capitol Hill that day and, according to the panel, they wanted to remove the then vice president. , Mike Pence, of the complex.

Committee investigators say texts from the day of the Capitol attack could shed light on how the Secret Service wanted to move Mr. Trump and Mr. Pence, while texts from the day before could provide greater clarity on how security plans have developed, the sources said.

Days before the attack on the Capitol, the Secret Service estimated that they probably could not guarantee the safety of Mr. Trump if he visited the Capitol on January 6 and, according to a person familiar with the report, the forwarded to senior White House officials.

On the day of the attack on the Capitol, according to testimony from former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson, the Secret Service played a major role in preventing Mr. Trump from going to the Capitol by returning to the West Wing after his speech at the Ellipse.

The committee believes the Secret Service text messages could provide a record of security plans for Jan. 6.

It was unclear whether texts from Anthony Ornato, a former agent turned White House deputy chief of staff, and Mr Trump’s senior agent Bobby Engel were among the messages deleted in a “device replacement program”. – Guardian

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